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THE PRESIDENT’S PLATE MAKEOVER

February 20, 2017

Overloaded with all things politics? We are too, but we couldn’t let Presidents’ Day go unnoticed. So Mr. President, we’d like to treat you to a food makeover in honor of this historic day. We’ve been keeping tabs on some of your menu favorites, and you might want to consider swapping out a few items…

Goodbye, Diet Coke. Hello, green tea and sparkling water. President Trump proudly states that he doesn’t drink coffee or tea, but he should reconsider. Antioxidant-rich green tea would be a better choice than artificial sweetener and artificial color-laden Diet Coke for his caffeine fix. Or is it the bubbles you love, Mr. Trump? If so, give Fruit-Infused Sparkling Water a try. It’s cold and refreshing, and fresh fruit gives you a bit of sweetness too (and better bragging rights).

Adios, KFC and McDonald’s. A good-quality cheeseburger every once in a while isn’t going to kill you, but constant consumption of Big Macs, fried chicken, and fast food might. A diet with less meat and more vegetables helps lower your risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and helps counteract climate change. And fast food is typically highly processed—packed with bad fats, chemicals, salt and added sugar. If it’s chicken you’re after, try these Garlic and Herb Roasted Chicken Thighs. Or if you’re jonesing for a burger, go for Eggplant BLT Sliders or Blackened Barramundi Sliders.

Ditch the chips. Sorry Donald, Lay’s potato chips and Doritos corn chips don’t count toward your daily vegetable intake. Instead, grab some Roasted Chickpeas for when the salty crunchy craving hits. They’re high in fiber and nutrients without any bad fat from the fryer.

Switch out ice cream bars for Banana “Ice Cream”. Store-bought ice cream is packed with added sugar and saturated fat. Making Banana “Ice Cream” at home in your food processor is equally as sweet and creamy, no added sugar required. Plus, it’ll help with your fruit intake.

WHAT YOU CAN DO THIS WEEK

Our health should be the ultimate nonpartisan issue. Congress is out of session so our members of Congress are in their home states for the week, and they would love to hear from you. Pay a visit to your Senators and Representatives, attend a town hall meeting, and tell them why protecting your health, the health of our communities and our planet is important to you.

Have an opinion on Sonny Perdue for example, President Trump’s pick for Secretary of Agriculture? Or the President’s pick for the Food and Drug Administration Secretary? Dislike that the proposed 20% tax on imported goods from Mexico to fund the wall would dramatically increase the price of your fruits and veggies? Or are you concerned about the effect a mass deportation would have on farming, our food economy, and the undocumented workers who grow America’s crops? Speak up for your health and your food!

And if your diet needs a makeover too, check out Foodstand’s Avoid Soda, Eat Less Meat, Avoid Fast Food, Eat Real Food, and Avoid Sweets Challenges to take your health into your own hands. And tell you friends so we can enact change together.

Features Recipes

SWAP THIS FOR THAT

February 1, 2017

Thursday, February 2, 2017. You might know it as Groundhog Day, but it’s also the day that most people kiss their unsustainable New Year’s resolutions goodbye. According to Foursquare and Swarm data, the first Thursday in February is the day that the rise in fast food check-ins and downturn in gym check-ins meet. Why? Every January the internet is abuzz with crash detoxes and diet fads, none of which are healthy or sustainable. And evidently, most don’t make it beyond a month.

But developing good eating habits isn’t about extremes like swearing off gluten forever, never eating fries again, or pretending dessert doesn’t exist. It’s about making a habit of choosing the better option (and even indulging once in a while). Here are some simple swaps you can make in 2017 to get and stay healthy this new year.

  1. Breakfast pastries for toast—Breakfast pastries (aka dessert in the morning) flood your body with a ton of sugar, and set you up for a mid-morning crash. Try whole grain toast with nut butter and banana slices; avocado, olive oil and sea salt; an egg, sautéd spinach and Sriracha; goat cheese and berries… Bottom line, ditch the added sugar for some whole grains, protein, healthy fats and fruit.
  2. Sugary cereal/granola for homemade muesliMuesli is a combination of raw oats, nuts, seeds, dried fruit and other whole grains. It is high in protein, low in added sugar, and delicious with milk or yogurt.
  3. Soda for seltzer—Seltzer aka soda water aka sparkling water is cold and fizzy without the chemicals or added sugar. If you need some sweetness, try adding frozen or fresh pieces of fruit to the bottom of your glass.
  4. Pepperoni pizza for veggie pizza—Thin crust pizza piled high with veggies from your local, family-run pizza joint is lower in fat and higher in vitamins, minerals and fiber than your typical meat-laden, chain-store pizza. Better yet, make it yourself!
  5. Hamburgers for veggie burgers—A thick slice of grilled mushroom or eggplant is a sustainable, meaty burger alternative, with less fat, and more vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Try these Eggplant Sliders the next time you get a hankering for a burger.
  6. Spaghetti for spiralized veggie noodles—Spiralized zucchini or squash is a great vehicle for your favorite pasta sauce without the refined carbs. Spiralized noodles give your body the vitamins, minerals and fiber it needs, plus extra flavor too. Try this recipe for Zoodles with Basil Pesto.
  7. French fries for sweet-potato “fries”Baked Sweet Potato Fries are lower in fat and higher in antioxidants. Plus, they’re naturally sweet, and help curb sugar cravings.
  8. Chips for crispy chickpeas—Protein-rich, Roasted Chickpeas are craveably crispy and salty, but without the bad fat from the fryer. Plus, they’re higher in fiber and nutrients too.
  9. White flour cookies for almond flour cookies—Almond flour is packed with protein, and making the cookies yourself lets you control the sugar. Try these Sesame and Anise Cookies that are sweetened with maple syrup.
  10. Ice cream for banana “ice cream”—Store-bought ice cream is packed with added sugar and saturated fat. Making Banana “Ice Cream” at home in your food processor is equally as sweet and creamy, no added sugar required.
  11. Candy bars for dark chocolate + nuts—Candy bars are often packed with sugar and chemicals. If you want a chocolatey treat, try dark chocolate (70% cacao or higher) with a handful of toasted almonds. Dark chocolate has less sugar, and nuts are full of protein to help your body manage the sugar load.
Features Recipes

Eat Healthy With 10 Minutes + $10 Per Day

January 5, 2017

10-min-10-dollars-graphic

You know you need to eat more healthfully, but doing so when you’re short on time and on a budget is NOT easy. Which is why we’ve come up with delicious and nutritious, easy-to-execute, minimally-processed, affordable meals so you can ditch the frozen dinners and cheap, bad-for-you snacks. With a little Sunday night prep, each of these meals can be made with less than 10 minutes of prep time. Budget < $10 per person per day

Track your healthy, home cooking habit by joining the Cook Dinner More Often Challenge on the Foodstand app. Happy cooking!

DAY 1

frittata-muffins

Breakfast: Frittata Muffins

Eggs are a good source of high-quality protein, and can be a key part of a balanced, no-added-sugar breakfast when combined with your favorite veggies. Bake them in muffin cups so you can grab one in the morning on your way out the door. They travel well, and can be eaten fresh out of the oven or cold out of the fridge.

Give your chopped veggies a quick stir fry (1 minute) while you whip up your eggs. Stir in the veggies, season with salt and pepper to taste, and pour into greased muffin cups. Bake on 400 until golden brown. Eat fresh, or store them in individual reusable containers in the fridge for a grab-and-go breakfast.

Avg Price: $2.00
Prep time: 3 minutes

 

Lunch: Protein Salad

Assembling salads can be time-consuming, but if you plan ahead with the right ingredients, you can put this together in a jiffy. Combine baby kale, lentil sprouts, sliced mushrooms, pumpkin seeds, chopped cauliflower, chopped cabbage, a couple of slivers of smoked salmon and a heaping spoon of hummus in a to-go container. Season with salt and pepper to taste. If your mushrooms, cauliflower, and cabbage are pre-chopped, you can assemble this in a matter of minutes. Adding hummus to your salad gives you extra fiber and protein, and acts as a dressing without wilting your salad during the day.

Avg Price: $3.60
Prep time: 3 minutes
slow-cooker-chicken-stew

Dinner: Slow Cooker Chicken Stew

Despite its name, the slow cooker is your best friend for speedy meals. Before you leave for work, toss your favorite veggies, grains, and protein in a slow cooker with water (or stock) and seasonings. Turn it on low, and by the time you get home, dinner will be ready! My favorite combination is lentils, chickpeas, tomato, organic chicken breast, farro, cauliflower, bell pepper, and garlic. Seasoned with salt, pepper, paprika, and fresh rosemary (which doesn’t wilt), or chili powder, cumin, cinnamon, cardamom, and coriander. On a cold winter night, this stew is filling, warm, and fully balanced for a nutritious meal.

Avg Price: $3.00
Prep time: 4 minutes

 

sweet-potato-crisps

Bonus Snack: Sweet Potato Crisps

Thinly slice a sweet potato (with a knife or a peeler), toss in olive oil, salt, pepper, paprika, and rosemary, and bake for 2 hours at 250 degrees. Flip them once about halfway through the baking process. Snack on these instead of chips or french fries.

Avg Price: $1.00
Prep Time: 4 minutes

 

 

DAY 2

overnight-oats

Breakfast: Overnight Oats in a Jar

The McDonald’s Dollar Menu has got nothing on this delicious, healthy breakfast. Jars give the ultimate convenience, but if you definitely need to discard your brekkie container, make it in a recyclable solo cup. Start with a base of plain rolled oats, then top with almond milk, nuts, cinnamon, and a drizzle of honey or coconut nectar for a bit of sweetness. By the next morning, you’ll have a DELICIOUS and filling breakfast that is ready to go when you are.

Avg Price: $1.17
Prep time: 2 minutes

 

avo-egg-toast

Lunch: Avo Egg Sandwich with Sprouts

Assembling a sandwich is one of the easiest things to do in the morning, but ensuring it holds up until lunchtime is the trick. This avo egg sandwich can be prepped in 5 minutes if you follow the right order of operations. First, heat oil in your egg pan. Put 2 slices sprouted whole grain bread in the toaster. Crack 2 eggs in the pan, season with salt and pepper, give it a quick stir, and turn the heat to low. Slice half of the avocado and sprinkle it with lemon juice. Grab the toast, flip the eggs, and slather one piece of toast with avocado. Once cooked, place the eggs on top of the avocado, top with sprouts, close your sandwich, and wrap it up. You’re done!

Avg Price: $2.20
Prep time: 4 minutes

 

chana-masala

Dinner: Butternut Squash Chana Masala

Butternut squash is quite surprisingly affordable this time of year since it’s in season, and is a great source of carotenoids and vitamin A. The squash seeds can also be scraped out and toasted for a yummy snack (or most grocery stores sell pre-chopped squash, saving you a ton of time). Making chana masala is pretty simple—in a large saucepan, start with a base of tempered cumin seeds followed by sautéed onion, ginger, and green chili. Add in spices (coriander powder, cumin powder, red chili powder, and turmeric), toss in the squash, chickpeas, and tomatoes, season with salt and pepper to taste, and wait for it to cook. Top with lemon juice, and serve like a “stew” with a whole grain like quinoa, barley, or farro for a well-balanced, filling meal.

Avg Price: $3.39
Prep time: 4 minutes

 

crunchy-roast-chickpeas

Bonus Snack: Roasted Crunchy Chickpeas

Rinse and pat dry canned chickpeas, toss in your favorite spices (our favorites include chili powder and curry powder or rosemary and lemon zest), salt and pepper to taste, and olive oil, and roast for 30 minutes at 450 degrees. There you have it—a delicious, crunchy snack for the week.

Avg Price $0.75
Prep time: 5 minutes

 

DAY 3

Photo credit: Nutrition Stripped

Photo credit: Nutrition Stripped

Breakfast: Sweet Potato Toasts with Almond Butter and Pumpkin Seeds

Swap sweet potato slices for your morning toast (they toast up in a toaster using the high setting for several cycles, or a total of about 15 minutes in a regular oven), and top with almond butter and pumpkin seeds—this is Mother Nature’s pop tart! You’ll get a healthy dose of fiber, protein, and hunger-fighting goodness with this hearty breakfast. If you’re on the go, sandwich two slices of sweet potato together and eat it on the run.

Avg Price: $1.15
Prep time: 4 minutes

 

baked-eggs

Lunch: Baked Eggs in Portobello Caps

Baked eggs are a perfect lunch to make before you head out the door in the morning. They take 2 minutes to prep, and bake to perfection while you’re getting ready. Lather two portobello mushroom caps in olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and place on a greased baking sheet. Crack 2 eggs in a bowl, whip, and stir in your favorite chopped veggies like broccoli, spinach, or thawed frozen edamame. Carefully pour half the egg and veggie mixture in each mushroom cap. Pop them in the oven at 375 degrees, and bake for about 25-30 minutes, until golden brown. Place them in a reusable container (preferably glass for easy reheating), and out the door you go!

Avg Price: $2.75
Prep time: 2 minutes

 

shakshuka

Dinner: Shakshuka

This Israeli brunch favorite can also be served as a one-pot dinner. You can customize it however you like by tossing in added veggies like broccoli or zucchini. This is also a perfect contender for chopped, frozen veggies to cut down on time. Start by sauteing onions and garlic in olive oil in a cast iron skillet. Add in a can of chopped tomatoes and veggies, and season with salt, pepper, paprika, chili flakes, and cumin. Let it simmer until tomatoes are mostly cooked.  Make a few dents in the tomato sauce with a big spoon, and crack each egg directly into each dent in the sauce, leaving space between each. Cover, and let the eggs get poached in the stew and either finish on the stovetop or pop it in the oven for 2 minute bake. If you like, serve it with a slice of whole grain pita bread.

Avg Price: $4.25
Prep time: 5 minutes

 

Bonus Snack: Apples with Almond Butter

Apple slices with almond butter are easy to prep at home or at work (especially with an apple corer), and provide the perfectly sweet, juicy, and tart snack you’re looking for at 3pm.

Avg Price: $1.75
Prep time: 2 minutes

 

Now that you have a game plan, maximize your dollar and the clock by carving out a little time to chop your veggies on Sunday nights. Or if you’re in a serious pinch, start with frozen, pre-chopped veggies. Stock your pantry with nut butter, canned beans, and whole grains so you have some on hand. And keep nuts and seasonal fruits in sight so you have an easy snack always at your fingertips.

Features

5 FOODS TO START AND STOP EATING IN 2017

January 3, 2017

5_foods_to_start_and_stop_eating

Good health in the new year isn’t a get-skinny diet, or a miracle superfood. Instead, the best piece of advice we can give is to eat a variety of real, unprocessed foods. It’s that simple. Here are some of our top picks for 2017—both what to eliminate, and what to enjoy—to become your healthiest you. Happy New Year! And happy eating too.

STOP EATING…

  1. Sweetened fruit yogurt. Don’t be fooled by the fruit on the label—one small strawberry yogurt can make up over half of your daily added sugar allotment even before you walk out the front door. Try unsweetened plain greek yogurt instead, and add your own fresh fruit.

  2. Liquid sugar. Whether it be soda or freshly-squeezed orange juice, consuming sugar in liquid form delivers your body with a huge quantity of sugar without any fiber to help your body process it. Ditch soda entirely, and stick to whole pieces of fruit.

  3. Artificial sweeteners. Artificial sweeteners such as Aspartame, Sucralose, Sorbitol and others have been linked with an increased risk for metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. Plus, they reprogram your taste buds into thinking fruit and other naturally sweet foods aren’t sweet enough.

  4. Packaged snack foods. While they may appear harmless, even savory packaged snacks often contain high levels of added sugar, sodium, and even chemicals and dyes. Stick with whole-food snacks like a piece of fruit with almonds, or carrots with hummus.

  5. Processed meats. Classified as a carcinogen by the World Health Organization, processed meats are said to cause colon cancer. On top of that, they often contain high amounts of sodium which can lead to heart disease, and nitrates which likely cause an increased risk of diabetes.

START EATING…

  1. Radicchio. With four times more antioxidants than romaine and a ton of disease-preventing polyphenols, dark red radicchio should make a regular appearance on your dinner plate. Counteract radicchio’s bitter flavor with fresh fruit and balsamic vinegar in a salad, or mellow its flavor by wilting it down with olive oil and sea salt.

  2. Butter beans (aka lima beans). They are high in protein which is great for blood sugar levels, and high in soluble fiber which helps lower cholesterol. Plus they’re a hearty vegetarian protein and taste delicious with almost anything (in stews, in tacos, sautéed with greens).

  3. Green moong dal flour. Another excellent source of protein and dietary fiber, green mung bean flour is a flavorful and nutrient-rich substitute for white flour that can be made into a wrap. Use it as you would a savory crêpe or breakfast burrito—our fave is scrambled egg, onion, chili peppers and fresh coriander.

  4. Fruit for dessert. Swapping added sugar for fresh fruit gives your body a healthy dose of vitamins, minerals and fiber, and may even help sharpen your taste buds. Try pairing with roasted pecans or almonds for a richer treat.

  5. 100% chocolate. Ditching sugar doesn’t have to mean giving up your chocolate habit. Many chocolatiers make a 100% cacao bar with no added sugar that is just as flavorful and high in antioxidants as their 70-90% dark chocolate counterparts. Try this François Pralus bar, and avoid lower quality unsweetened varieties you find in the baking section at your grocery store.

  6. BONUS! Kelp. You’ve probably seen the hype, and it is so real. This protein-packed, sustainable, plant-based, gluten-free, zero-junk ingredient should be added to your repertoire. Use kelp noodles to replace lo mein or spaghetti for a healthier version of your favorites. You’ll also be able to get your hands on some Kelp Jerky soon so you’ll be able to snack to your heart’s content.

Features

HOW TO LOVE THE HOLIDAYS

December 12, 2016

holiday_survival_guide_foodstand

Holiday season is in full swing, and you likely have more than a few festivities on the calendar. And joyfully, partaking in the delicious food and drink doesn’t have to mean getting off track. Rely on your good eating habits to embrace the season and appreciate every bite of delicious food you eat, by being mindful and making the better choice. And don’t forget, you can eat your favorite holiday cookie and still be a good eater—simply use a free pass and remember to enjoy it!

Here are our Top 5 Holiday Good Eating Tips to help you stay on track:

  1. Start the day off right. Eating a protein-packed breakfast like Baked Eggs with Herbs, Quinoa Cups, or plain yogurt with fresh fruit helps you avoid the morning sugar rush. Eating well early in the day can prevent getting off track once the sun sets.
  2. Veg out. You’re bound to find veggies and hummus on the buffet table. Eat those first, and then have a small serving of something more decadent. And if you’re in charge of a dish, make these Roasted Butternut Squash Skewers, this Braised Fennel and Blood Orange Salad, or a Turnip and Kale Gratin.
  3. Swap cookies and cakes with fruit. The holidays are notorious for dessert overload—get your sweet fix from fruit instead. You can roast them like this, poach them in wine, or blend them for a dairy-free ice cream.
  4. Drink responsibly. If you’re going the alcohol-free route, swap sugary soda for sparkling water with fresh fruit. If you are drinking alcohol, opt for wine or clear cocktails without sugary mixers (beware of margaritas, mojitos and fruit punch). And be sure to alternate alcohol and water to stay hydrated, not feel as hungry, and avoid the dreaded holiday hangover. Plus it’ll help you Drink 8 Glasses of Water a Day!
  5. Plan your passes. If you’ve decided to use a free pass and eat a cider doughnut at your school or office party, then do it, and enjoy every minute of it! But don’t let one turn into two or three or four.

Join one of Foodstand’s Holiday Challenges to stay on track—focus on eating less processed food and less sugar: Avoid Soda, Avoid Sugar at Breakfast, Avoid Sweets, Avoid Added Sugar, Drink Less Alcohol, Drink 8 Glasses of Water, Make Your Lunch, or Cook Dinner More Often. And while you’re at one of your holiday parties, invite a friend to do the Challenge with you! It’s much more festive when you do it together.

Features

A MINDFUL THANKSGIVING

November 21, 2016

thanksgiving

The holidays are all about good cheer, gratitude, family, friends, and delicious food. But the season can also conjure up feelings of guilt and dread—tempting food overcomes our better judgement, leaving us full of regret. Every year festive recipes flood the internet, and come January, they are replaced with articles about weight loss and getting back on track after an indulgent month of overly rich food and too many desserts. But partaking in holiday festivities shouldn’t mean getting off track. The good eating habits you’ve been developing—being mindful and making the better choice—allow you to embrace the holidays, food and all, and enjoy the season even more.

The key to success is practicing moderation, which is why Challenge check-ins include free passes. You shouldn’t have to forgo a slice of pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving dinner to be a good eater. Have one serving of pie, use your free pass, and enjoy it even more—knowing that you’re continuing to develop good eating habits and eating pie, at the same time!

Here are our Top 5 Thanksgiving Good Eating Tips to help you keep up the good work:

  1. Don’t starve yourself on Thanksgiving morning because you know you’re going to eat a lot at dinner. Eat a well-balanced meal with protein and fiber to fill you up and give you energy. If you’re famished come dinner time, you’re more likely to over-indulge and make poor choices when filling your plate.
  2. Plan ahead. If you know you’re going to have meat for dinner, then don’t eat meat for lunch. If you know you’re going to have a piece of pie with whipped cream for dessert, don’t have a pastry for breakfast. Plan your Thanksgiving day meals in order to enjoy your free passes at dinner and still stay on track.
  3. Fill most of your plate with vegetables. One awesome thing about Thanksgiving dinner is all of the delicious vegetable side dishes. Sautéed green beans, crispy brussels sprouts, stuffed winter squash, and caramelized carrots should make it easy to cover most of your plate with veggies. Then fill the rest with turkey, gravy and stuffing.
  4. Don’t take too much. Just because it’s Thanksgiving doesn’t mean you should have to unbutton your pants to feel comfortable after dinner. Overeating likely means regret and guilt, neither of which are any fun. Plus, you need to save some room for pie, right?!
  5. Eat one bite at a time. If you eat too quickly, you won’t fully enjoy your Thanksgiving meal, and will likely overeat. The good news is that eating one bite at a time is much easier with your family and friends!

Yes, Thanksgiving dinner is about food, but it’s also about people sitting around the table, and having good conversation with those we care about. Share how the good eating habits you’ve been developing allow you to stay on track, and keep you and the planet healthy.

Invite your friends and family to join a Mindful Eating Challenge with youEat At Least 1 Distraction-Free Meal, Eat One Bite At A Time, No Food Waste or Stop Eating 2 Hours Before Bed. Let’s help each other maintain our mindful eating habits this holiday season!

#NoFoodWaste Features

Food Waste: A Pervasive Problem with Abounding Solutions

June 17, 2016
Photo by Summer Rayne Oakes

Photo by Summer Rayne Oakes

This post was written by Emily Summerlin, an Ambassador for Foodstand, a community aiming to build a more informed community around good food and to bring good eating choices to all. Here she covers the food waste epidemic, including background on and implications of the issue, the release of the ReFED Roadmap to Reduce US Food Waste report, and Foodstand’s #NoFoodWaste campaign.

 

The United States “spends $218 billion a year, or 1.3% of GDP, growing, processing, and transporting food that is never eaten.” Put simply by Sam Kass, NBC’s Senior Food Analyst, “that is insane.”

In addition to the huge economic costs this problem incurs for the United States, this is tragic not only in the sense that one in seven Americans is food insecure, but also in that this wasted food emits a harmful stream of greenhouse gases as it decomposes in the landfill, further contributing to global climate change. It is incomprehensible that this issue, so monstrous and detrimental to our economy and human and environmental health, has only recently emerged into the mainstream spotlight and found its way into the consciousness of American eaters, largely thanks to a segment on John Oliver’s Last Week Tonight last summer.

Fortunately, this momentum has kept the food waste epidemic in the spotlight, with a number of new organizations and campaigns focusing on redistribution of would-be wasted food popping up all over the world. The World Resources Institute and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization recently completed a study highlighting the countries leading the fight against food waste; the Love Food Hate Waste campaign in the UK serves to raise awareness about the need to reduce food waste and to help consumers take action; and Imperfect Produce in the San Francisco Bay Area delivers ‘ugly produce’, fruits and vegetables that don’t fit grocery stores’ cosmetic standards, to consumers. These are just a few examples of actors on all scopes and levels presently making a difference in the sweeping worldwide movement to end food waste.

Additionally, one of the more notable publications in the space is the recent release of ReFED’s Roadmap to Reduce US Food Waste, a comprehensive report laying out the plan to reduce the United State’s food waste by 20% through a number of feasible, cost-effective, and scalable solutions. The report boasts a new approach to looking at the food waste issue as the first comprehensive report to examine the food waste problem and lay out solutions using economics and data analysis.

The basics of the strategy and actions the report lays out are organized under the four pillars of education, policy, innovation, and financing. Without getting too into the weeds, the bottom line finding after the extensive research and modeling that went into the creation of the report is that “an $18 billion investment in 27 solutions to reduce US food waste by 20% will yield $100 billion in net societal economic value over a decade,” a figure that includes tons of food recovered, gallons of water saved, business profit, consumer savings, tons of greenhouse gas emissions reduced, and jobs created.

One key image in the report is a curve laying out 27 solutions ranked by their potential impact vs. cost in three categories: prevention, recovery, and recycling. The solutions that came out on top for greatest economic value per ton were standardized date labeling, consumer education campaigns, and packaging adjustments; while the solutions with most diversion potential were centralized composting, centralized anaerobic digestion, and water resources recovery facilities with anaerobic digestion. While the solutions with the most diversion potential do require a large amount of planning and capital investment, the diversion that will come from consumer education campaigns is substantial.

This means that as individuals, we can take action right now and make a huge difference. At present, 43% of food waste occurs in homes, which equals 27 million tons of food wasted each year. Hopefully as a result of the report’s findings, date labeling laws and consumer education campaigns will begin rolling out soon, but right now it is in the consumers’ hands to educate ourselves and do everything we can to reduce food waste in our own lives.

The first step in doing this is to change our attitudes about food waste, and think instead in terms of wasted food. The word “waste” implies something old, useless, and without value, but the 63 million tons of food being wasted in the U.S. are perfectly edible, nourishing, and delicious. There are numerous resources that provide tips on smarter grocery shopping and how to cook with parts of fruits and vegetables you normally wouldn’t utilize. One such resource is Foodstand’s #NoFoodWaste campaign that the community is centering around for the month of June. The campaign encourages Foodstand users to post their best tips, recipes, and news regarding food waste reduction throughout the month, and serves as a great source of inspiration for taking action to be a waste-free consumer and finding creativity in the kitchen.

 

Instructions for making agua fresca with fruit just past its prime from food writer @JenniferEmilson

 

A ‘Behind the Plate’ interview with Keith Carr, City Harvest’s Healthy Neighborhoods Manager by Foodstand team member @annefood

 

A recipe for roasted broccoli stem and fennel soup from food writer @munchiemummy

 

A tip on regrowing veggies from their scraps with just sunshine and water from @SallyRogers of Nibble market

In addition to making changes to your own shopping and cooking habits, look for organizations in your area that focus on fighting food waste through food recovery, either through saving “ugly” produce from rotting in the field or by facilitating donations to food banks. Acting on these individual solutions will enable us to in turn scale up the solutions as a society and touch on the three pillars of the solution that ReFED lays out beyond education: policy, innovation, and financing. Food waste is a truly pervasive issue that not only affects our environment and communities on multiple levels, but on the positive side presents numerous areas for improvement and avenues for taking action.

Features Recipes

HOW TO BE A ZERO

May 30, 2016

BE A ZERO! PRATICE #NOFOODWASTE

Did you know that we waste up to 40% of our food? Almost half! To put it in perspective, that’s about 400 pounds per American every year—wasted. Yet one in seven people in the US is food insecure.

We launched our first #NoFoodWaste campaign last November, and gave you our Top 5 Ways to Cut Food Waste. Reducing waste at home is key—we are the largest slice of the food waste pie (making up over 40%) but over 60% of waste happens before food even gets to our homes. Each week this month, we’ll fill you in on the larger picture of food waste along the supply chain.

How can you Be A Zero? We ask you to have zero food waste! For the month of June, share your #NoFoodWaste tips and photos on the Foodstand app in preparation for June 30th, our Official Day of Zero Waste. Each #NoFoodWaste post you make and every friend you refer to Foodstand enters you to win $25 from Brooklyn Kitchen.

Speaking of which, congratulations to last week’s final #FoodRevolution prizewinners— @MrsXtina for inviting a friend to Foodstand, and the winner of Jamie Oliver’s new book, @JenniferEmilson, for her watermelon buckwheat granola post!

EAT & DRINK


KIMCHI FRITTATA by gingerandchorizo

kimchi_frittata_gingerandchorizo_foodstand_recipe

INGREDIENTS

300g (10-11 ounces) new potatoes, thinly sliced
8 free-range organic eggs (assume 2 per person, so you know if you want to make a bigger potion)
a handful of broccoli, roughly chopped
half a courgette (zucchini), halved lengthwise then cut into half moon disks
a small red bell pepper, diced
1 cup of packed Kimchi, homemade or shop-bought
salt and pepper to taste
vegetable oil

METHOD

Preheat the broiler to the highest temperature.

Beat the eggs in a large bowl and season with a good pinch of sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Set aside.

Warm a splash of vegetable oil in an oven-proof frying pan or skillet, then add the sliced potato and pan-fry for about 5 minutes or until the potato turns golden brown and translucent. Turn a few times to make sure they are evenly cooked. Season to taste.

Add the vegetables to the potato and fry for a minute, then add another pinch of salt and pepper to the pan. Put the lid on and cook the vegetables for about 4 minutes on medium low heat. Stir once or twice, then add the kimchi and combine well.

Turn the heat up to medium and pour in the beaten eggs (make sure the vegetables are covered evenly with the egg). Cook on the stove until the edge of the egg has started to turn solid, and there are air bubbles popping up everywhere in between the vegetables.

Transfer the pan to the oven under the broiler for about 6-9 minutes or until the eggs are set and the surface takes on a nice brown colour.

Remove the pan from the oven and set aside to cool down a little bit. You can either turn the frittata on a serving plate or serve it straight from the pan. Serve with more kimchi if desired.

Serves 4


RED CURRY SOUP by annefood

red_curry_soup_annefood_foodstand_recipe

INGREDIENTS

1 yellow onion, halved and sliced thin
5 cloves garlic, minced (prep the garlic 10 minutes before cooking to maximize nutritional value)
3” knob ginger, peeled and minced
2 red jalapeños, minced
1 can coconut milk
1 can lite coconut milk
4 ounces red curry paste
1 quart vegetable broth
3 carrots, sliced into thick half-moons
1 small head of broccoli, cut into florets
about 15 medium baby bella mushrooms, quartered
3/4 – 1 lb small shrimp, peeled and deveined
3 tablespoons Braggs Liquid Aminos
3 tablespoons sesame oil
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
5 ounces rice noodles
3 heads baby bok choy, sliced
1 bunch scallions, chopped into 1-inch pieces (greens too)
juice of 1/2 lime
sea salt
extra virgin olive oil and/or coconut oil

METHOD

Add a few tablespoons of olive and/or coconut oil to a pot over medium heat. Add the sliced onion and sauté, stirring often, until onion starts to show some color but is still fairly firm (a few minutes).

Push the onion to the edges of the pan and turn heat to medium-low. Add another splash of oil in the center of the pan if needed, and add the garlic, ginger and jalapeño. Cook for a minute or two, until fragrant and lightly golden, then stir with the onions.

Add the coconut milks and red curry paste. Stir to combine. Add the vegetable broth, raise the heat to medium-high, and bring to a boil. Add the carrots and cook for a few minutes. Add the broccoli and mushrooms, and cook for another minute or two.

Add the shrimp to the pot, and push them to the bottom so they are submerged. Stir in the Braggs, sesame oil, and red pepper flakes. After one minute, stir in the rice noodles, making sure they break apart and don’t stick.

Add the bok choy, scallions, lime juice and a large pinch of sea salt. Cook for a few minutes until the shrimp are cooked through, and the rice noodles and bok choy are tender. Serve immediately.

Serves 4-6.

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KEEP CALM AND COOK ON

May 23, 2016
food_revolution_jamie_oliver_foodstand_etsummer_quiche

Photo @etsummer

JOIN THE FOOD REVOLUTION—IT’S NOT TOO LATE!

We celebrated Food Revolution Day with Jamie Oliver last Friday, but the #FoodRevolution isn’t over yet! You still have 6 days left (deadline is Sunday, May 29th at midnight EST) to enter our two Food Revolution contests.

Here’s how!

1. Join Jamie Oliver on the app and share recipes and tips that have saved your life using #FoodRevolution. Every tagged post counts as an entry to win an autographed copy of Jamie’s new book.

2. Once you share, invite 3 of your friends to join the Revolution on Foodstand—each friend you bring to Foodstand enters you to win $100 at Brooklyn Kitchen.

A big congratulations to last week’s Brooklyn Kitchen prizewinner @mr_good_food for inviting a friend to Foodstand, and the winner of Jamie’s new book, @Lulu, for her spring garlic #FoodRevolution post! Keep up the good work, and stay tuned for next week’s final winners. It could be you!

EAT & DRINK


ROAST CHICKEN WITH POTATOES & CARROTS by Jamie Oliver

chicken_jamie_oliver_foodstand_food_revolution

INGREDIENTS

1 pound carrots
1¼ pounds potatoes
1 head of garlic
5 sprigs of fresh rosemary
olive oil
3½-pound whole higher-welfare chicken
1 lemon
5 sprigs of fresh thyme

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Scrub, trim and halve the carrots lengthways. Scrub, peel and halve the potatoes, quartering any larger ones. Add to a large roasting pan.

Break the head of garlic into cloves, leaving them unpeeled, then lightly crush with the flat side of a knife. Pick the rosemary leaves, discarding the stalks. Add the garlic and rosemary leaves to the pan. Drizzle with oil, season with sea salt and black pepper, then toss well and spread out in an even layer.

Rub the chicken all over with a pinch of salt and pepper, and a drizzle of oil. Stuff the chicken cavity with the whole lemon and the thyme sprigs. Place the chicken in the pan, on top of the vegetables.

Reduce the oven temperature to 400ºF, then add the chicken and roast for 45 minutes. Carefully remove the pan from the oven, use tongs to turn the vegetables over, then spoon any juices from the pan over the chicken.

Return the pan to the oven for a further 30 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through. To check, pierce a chicken thigh with the tip of a sharp knife – if the juices run clear, it’s done. Otherwise return the pan to the oven, cook for a little while longer and repeat the test.

Once cooked, transfer the chicken to a board and return the vegetables to the oven for a final 5 minutes to crisp up, if needed. Cover the chicken with a layer of aluminum foil and a dish towel, then leave to rest for 10 to 15 minutes.

Using a sharp carving knife, cut up the chicken, then serve with the roasted veggies. Delicious with a green salad on the side.

Serves 4; Ready in 1 hour 45 minutes


FALENTIL by debspots

falentil_debspots_food_revolution_foodstand_famie_oliver

INGREDIENTS

1 cup lentils
1 sweet potato
1 celery rib, minced
1 scallion or 2 fat, wild chives, sliced thinly
1 large jerusalem artichoke, diced (optional)
3 tbs olive oil
1/3 cup panko, regular or gluten free
1/4 cup salted toasted almonds
cumin, to taste
cayenne, to taste
salt and pepper

METHOD

If you have time, brining lentils improves their flavor and texture. Then cook them in simmering water until they are tender: 5-7 minutes of they’re brined, 15-20 if not. Drain very well.

Cook the sweet potato in the microwave for 6 minutes or conventional oven for 50-60 minutes, until very soft.

Sauté the scallion or chives, celery, and jerusalem artichoke, if using, in 1 tbs. of the the oil for 5 minutes or so, until the vegetables soften.

Place the almonds in the bowl of a food processor and buzz until finely ground; stop before you make almond butter. Add the remaining ingredients and process until everything comes together in a mass and is uniformly pulverized. It’s ok if you have some texture, but you don’t want whole lentils or big chunks of veggies. You’ll want to stop and scrape the bowl a few times. Taste for and adjust seasoning.

Scrape this lovely paste into a big bowl, cover, and refrigerate for at least an hour and up to a day. Form into 9 patties, roughly 2 inches across and ¾ inch thick.

Preheat the oven to 350°. Heat the remaining 2 tbs. oil in a heavy, large, nonstick skillet. Cook the falentils over med-high heat until browned, about 5 minutes; flip and brown on the second side. Slide the pan into the oven for 15 minutes until the patties are heated through. Serve immediately, or refrigerate and reheat in a conventional or microwave oven—they reheat beautifully!

There are so many ways to serve these. They’re great with traditional falafel accompaniments like hummus, tomatoes, olive oil, lemon, lettuce, pita… Or you could treat them like a burger—top with mayo, ketchup, mustard, tomato, onion. Or try them with Tzatziki or Tahini Sauce with Herbs.

Makes 9 falentils, serves 4 as a main course.

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Where you NEED to be this week

May 16, 2016

FOOD REVOLUTION WEEK —TIME TO KICK INTO ACTION

Food Revolution Day is this Friday, May 20th! How are you going to celebrate to help Foodstand and Jamie Oliver fix the food system? Join us at our Food Revolution Day events all week long to celebrate IRL (in real life)!

Tonight, Monday May 16th, it’s Foodstand’s Good Food Spotlight. Tomorrow, Tuesday May 17th, we have the one and only Michael Moss at Food Film & Book Club discussing his #1 NY Times Bestseller Salt Sugar Fat. Not in New York? You can host your own FB&FC event! And Friday, May 20th—Food Revolution Day we’ll be streaming live from the Union Square Greenmarket doing a special Jamie Oliver recipe demo. Stop by, say “Hi!” and be entered to win prizes!

A big congratulations to last week’s Brooklyn Kitchen prizewinner @cedric for inviting a friend to Foodstand, and the winner of Jamie’s new book, @munchiemummy for her cooked lettuce #FoodRevolution post! Keep up the good work, and stay tuned for next week’s winners!

EAT & DRINK


VEGGIE NOODLE STIR-FRY by Jamie Oliver

veggie_noodle_stir_fry_foodstand_food_revolution_jamie_oliver

INGREDIENTS

8 ounces thick flat rice noodles (rice sticks) or chow mein-style egg noodles
1 red onion
2 cloves of garlic
2 inch piece of fresh root ginger
1/4 of a bunch of fresh cilantro
1 small head of broccoli
1 red or yellow bell pepper
12 ounces firm tofu
1 carrot
optional: 1/2 a fresh red chile
3/4 cup raw cashew nuts
vegetable oil
4 ounces snow peas
4 ounces baby spinach
2 limes
Asian sesame oil
low-salt soy sauce

METHOD

Cook the noodles following the package instructions, then drain and refresh in cold water (this stops them from over-cooking) and place to one side.

On a cutting board, peel and thinly slice the onion, then peel and finely chop the garlic. Peel the ginger using a teaspoon, then chop into matchsticks.

Pick the cilantro leaves and finely chop the stalks. Cut the broccoli florets off the stalk, halve any larger florets, then thinly slice the stalk. Halve the bell pepper, scoop out the seeds and pith with a teaspoon, then slice into strips.

Cut the tofu into rough ¾ inch cubes. Using a vegetable peeler, peel the carrot lengthways into long ribbons. Trim and halve the chile lengthways (if using), then run a teaspoon down the cut side to scoop out the seeds and white pith. Thinly slice at an angle, then wash your hands thoroughly.

Place a wok or large non-stick frying pan on a medium heat, add the cashew nuts, and toast until golden, stirring regularly. Tip into a small bowl.

Place the wok or pan back on high heat and drizzle in 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil. Add the red onion, garlic, ginger and cilantro stalks, then fry for 2 minutes, or until lightly golden, stirring regularly.

Throw in the broccoli, bell pepper, tofu and snow peas, and fry for 2 minutes, stirring regularly. Stir in the spinach and let it wilt, then add the noodles and carrot ribbons. Toss well for a minute to heat through.

Squeeze over the juice from half the lime, add 1 teaspoon of sesame oil and 2 tablespoons of soy sauce, then toss to coat. Sprinkle over the sliced chile (if using), toasted nuts and the reserved cilantro leaves, then serve with lime wedges for squeezing.

Serves 4; Ready in 30 minutes

 


PARSNIP COCONUT CREAM SOUP by irobbedafarmer

parsnip_coconut_soup_foodstand

INGREDIENTS

6 medium diced parsnips
2 cloves of garlic
1 cup diced sweet onion
1 can organic coconut milk
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon grated ginger—add more if you like it with a stronger kick
1/3 cup olive oil
Salt and pepper
5 cups water

METHOD

Preheat oven to 400 degrees where parsnips will roast for 20-30 minutes until soft, but not burnt.

Bring a cast iron pan to medium heat, add olive oil, onions and garlic. Stir for about a minute until the garlic and onion are getting soft but not browned. Add parsnips, turmeric, cumin, salt and pepper and stir until all are mixed well.

When parsnips are ready, put them in a blender with the five cups of water. Blend until soft and smooth, then transfer to the heated pan. Add the coconut milk and ginger. Stir until all is mixed well and let it simmer for about 5 minutes.

Ready to serve! You can garnish with snap peas or cilantro to give it a green kick!